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Mission Hills

Tell us what Mission Hills means to you

  • What makes this a good place to live? What are the downsides?

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I lived in Mission Hills on 1971 we had a huge earthquake at the time we had to evacuate, at that time it was a very "exclusive" neighborhood, people were screened and see if they fit with the community. I loved the small town feeling, Granda Hills was so close you can walk a short distance and you were there. I have visited the place several times since we left, but it has changed so much I don't recognize the neighborhood anymore, but well those were the good old times in MISSION HILLS....

— Dora
June 27, 2012 at 1:42 p.m.

AHHHHH... my hometown! Grew up here. My parents moved to Memory Park Ave in the mid 70's when I was a toddler. I still visit them there every year. Although I live far away now, I never forget those hot summer nights, riding bikes, swimming in the neighbor's pool and sneaking off to the 7-11 on Chatsworth and Sepulveda to play Street Fighter. The neighborhood really hasn't changed too much over the years. It's still pretty diversified. For a while, in the mid 90's, a gang problem started to rear it's ugly head but that seems to have subsided. All in all a decent neighborhood filled with decent working-class people.

— Clint
April 20, 2012 at 8:04 a.m.

I moved into my new house here on Jan. 1, 2003. Completely remember the day. I wasn't so sure about the area next to the Mission, but my lot was huge and the house was amazing. I have since come to love love love it here. It feels out of town, but incredibly convenient. I'm also a fan of those things early Los Angeles and California, and you can't go further back than the San Fernando Mission in this area. Great place to live.

— Kevin
September 8, 2010 at 9:36 a.m.

My family moved to Mission Hills in 1964. Back then, it was the BEST place to live. Each street was its own community; all of the families knew each other and yearly neighborhood picnics were the norm. We used to play in the wash that ran along Woodman Ave (it has been a housing addition for years). There was a new drain pipe that ran underneath Woodman Ave that quickly became our very own tunnel. I can still remember the feeling I would get after a hard day of swimming and playing during the summer - if it hurt to breathe, then we played hard enough. Little did we know that the smog was a dangerous as it is. My neighbor and I would often hop on our bikes and ride to the Chatsworth Hills and explore. We loved to sit on top of the entrance to the train tunnel and feel the rush of the wind as the train speed underneath. As long as we were home before dark, all was good. And who could forget listening to Sweet Dick Whittington on our very own KGIL just down the street! Although I moved away almost 30 years ago, I will never forget my life back in good old Mission Hills!

— Richard
April 27, 2010 at 10:08 p.m.

We, my wife and two sons, bought our first house in March 2009. We were undedided between the Antelope Valley or staying in my native San Fernando Valley. We found a great home in Mission Hills with a 12,000 sq. ft. lot so my kids can have a place to play and have fun. I am glad that we did, love the neighborhood and the neighbors. My commute to work is only a 10 min. drive to Van Nuys. Great place to raise our kids, we will probably be here for the long run.

— Jose
March 31, 2010 at 10:27 p.m.

I lived across from the San Fernando Mission in the 60's and early 70 ( left in 72). It was family friendly, with the park as a gathering place for so many different gatherings ( picnics, football, soccer and frisby) Traffic wasn't bad, and the neighbors took care of each other ( especially after the 71 quake) It is the smog that caused me to decide not to move there after my 21 years in the military. Schools were good, with the old Alemany in bad shape after the 1st quake. there were rivalaries, but they were healthy. Discipline was not a question, it was a norm and parent nights were well attended.

— Mike
December 11, 2009 at 1:24 p.m.

I've lived in Mission Hills since the early 80's. It's a great place to live. Even though its population has increased, it still has a small town feel. And I love the diversity. Mission Hills has an active Neighborhood Watch and Neighborhood Council. On the downside, traffic has increased significantly on Sepulveda Boulevard. I believe that's because people use it as a detour when the 405 freeway gets crowded. Traffic on other major streets has also increased. It will probably get worse if limits aren't placed on development. Community members have already fought off one proposed development and another one has been proposed for the area.

— Norma Placensia
October 28, 2009 at 7:42 p.m.

We have been here since the early 70's. What was once a family neighborhood, now has ALL of the family(not us). They bring others, park all over the streets, leaving no place for the guests. We are lucky though, everyone pretty much knows each other and are somewhat respectful. Hidden treasures are long gone. We loved Bob's on Brand and Sepulveda for the Friday nights with the children. Times change and I guess we must too.

— Anna
September 27, 2009 at 7:29 p.m.

Is a good place to live becuase it's population is diverse.

Our landmark is the San Fernando Mission.

— Gadiel Palomo
August 20, 2009 at 2:43 p.m.

When was Mission Hills, CA in the San Fernando Valley established?

— Tom
August 19, 2009 at 9:06 a.m.

Mission Hills

is a neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles in the San Fernando Valley region of Los Angeles County.
The neighboring communities are Arleta, Granada Hills, North Hills, Pacoima, Panorama City, San Fernando and Sylmar.
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About This Project
Mission Hills is one of the 272 neighborhoods in Mapping L.A., The Times’ resource for crime, neighborhoods, demographics and schools.
About The Data Desk

This page was created by the Data Desk, a team of reporters and Web developers in downtown L.A.